Cantissimo Senior Living Blog

Cantissimo Senior Living blog - an educational resource for older adults in lifestyle, wellness, and more.

Posts about Health News:

What Is Telehealth? Is It Right for You?

What Is Telehealth? Is It Right for You?

What is Telehealth

Telehealth, the delivery of healthcare services virtually, is an increasingly popular practice that many people are looking at to replace typical in-person delivery. Telehealth can include video conference medical appointments, health apps, and remote patient monitoring. Throughout the last year, people have been forced to schedule telehealth medical appointments due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As many have experienced, this can be a viable option for many, especially seniors, looking forward.

Telemedicine

People often confuse telehealth and telemedicine, but they are two different things. While telehealth is a virtual communication mode between doctors and patients, telemedicine uses technology to deliver care to patients virtually. Therefore, telemedicine is less broad than telehealth because it only refers to remote clinical services.

Simplifying the COVID-19 Vaccines [May 2021 UPDATE]

Simplifying the COVID-19 Vaccines [May 2021 UPDATE]

Note: This post has been updated May 12, 2021.

Even though the COVID-19 virus continues to spread, the U.S. vaccination process is cause for decreased transmission rates nationwide. Nearly one-third of the U.S. population, above the age of sixteen, are fully vaccinated, with an average of two million tests administered daily. In the last two weeks, daily reported cases of infection are down 29.7%. There are currently three FDA unapproved vaccines under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), including the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson and Johnson’s Janssen vaccine.

How mRNA Vaccines Work

The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are both classified as mRNA vaccines. Unlike other vaccines, this type does not inject the virus into an individual. Instead, mRNA vaccines create a protein that triggers an immune response to produce antibodies. Obtaining antibodies for COVID-19 protects individuals from getting infected when they come in contact with the virus.

5 Ideas to Safely Celebrate the Holidays During COVID-19

5 Ideas to Safely Celebrate the Holidays During COVID-19

As the United States enters the tenth month in quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the holiday season will look different this year.

Within the past month, coronavirus cases have risen. November 3rd, 2020, marked a record high of 100,667 COVID-19 hospitalizations. As of the beginning of December, the U.S. has had 14,736,470 reported cases of COVID-19 and 285,280 deaths.

After Thanksgiving, there have been reported spikes of coronavirus cases, most likely caused by college students going home and families gathering, as usual. With Thanksgiving in the past, the temperatures will continue to drop, and the opportunities to gather outside will soon be even more limited for many states. Now, looking forward to Hanukkah, Christmas, and the new year, extra safety precautions must be taken to ensure others' safety.

While it is disappointing to break holiday traditions, there are still ways to celebrate the holidays safely. Now is the time to make new traditions and continue showing love and appreciation for loved ones.

Adjusting to Life After a Stroke

Adjusting to Life After a Stroke

In America, stroke is the third leading cause of death. The brain and heart rely on each other to sustain the basic functionalities of the human body. The brain controls a large portion of the body's range of capabilities and nerve signaling. Your brain has multiple purposes, but a single stroke can put those critical functions at risk. Communication, memory, emotional activity, and physical capabilities can all be affected when the brain is not operating at its utmost potential.

Difference Between a Stroke and a Heart Attack

A stroke and a heart attack may seem similar but are very different. Both ailments occur due to a shortage of oxygenated blood and blood flow. However, strokes primarily affect the brain, while heart attacks mainly target the heart. When the body's blood flow to the heart is blocked, sometimes due to a blood clot, it can cause a heart attack. A stroke, on the other hand, can cause possible brain tissue to decay and long-term disability or death.

Aging in Place: The Assisted Living Option

Aging in Place: The Assisted Living Option

As lifespans have increased, the idea of "aging in place" has gained popularity. Defined as "…remaining living in the community, with some level of independence, rather than in residential care.", this typically means living in one's private residence for as long as possible. These days, a combination of family help, home health aides, and adaptions to living quarters have allowed older adults to stay in their homes longer.

For many, however, health or other problems crop up and lead to a senior living arrangement outside the home. Very often, this is assisted living.

Assisted living emerged as a concept in the early 1980s in response to the hospital-like, institutional nature of nursing homes. At the outset, assisted living focused on providing mostly non-medical support for older adults in a more home-like setting structured to preserve their independence, dignity, privacy, and choice.

Within a few years, it became apparent there was an issue for residents whose health declined beyond the facility's ability to support them. While it was clear that their increased needs weren't being met, residents were reluctant to move for two reasons. First, the move from their original home was a difficult, significant life change. Second, the move from assisted living often was to a nursing home; the very place most hoped to avoid by moving to assisted living. Residents desired an opportunity to age in place in an assisted living setting.

What are the Best Sleeping Positions for Older Adults?

What are the Best Sleeping Positions for Older Adults?

Sleep is vital when growing up, and the same is true as we age. However, for older adults, sleeping patterns frequently change. Often, older adults begin experiencing trouble falling asleep or waking up. Others struggle to reach a state of deep sleep. That said, when this happens, don't assume it's a normal part of aging. These could be symptoms of insomnia or other sleep-related conditions. Therefore, ensuring you receive a good night's sleep is important and needs to be consistent, just like when you were younger.

Through a good night's sleep, your mental health and memory improve. Your body can repair worn-out cells and tissues, and your immune system is refreshed. With this, your body can better fight diseases and stay healthy. On the other hand, a poor night's sleep can make you susceptible to memory problems, attention issues, and even depression. Further, it leads to a sense of fatigue during the day and worsened focus.

Best Sleeping Positions for Older Adults

If you want to enhance your sleep quality and health, your sleeping position may be a great place to start. For a full and restorative sleep, consider changing to one of the following recommended sleep positions:

The Opportunity Generation: The Emergence of the Longevity Economy

The Opportunity Generation: The Emergence of the Longevity Economy

If you are age 50 or older, Joseph Coughlin, founder and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, thinks you are misunderstood.

In his 2017 book, "The Longevity Economy: Inside the World's Fastest-Growing, Most Misunderstood Market," Coughlin contends consumer marketing companies and society, in general, underestimate the potential of the older generation.

He says this underestimation is exemplified in the false narrative that older adults are a less important demographic than groups under 50. This attitude particularly pervades marketers who spend 500% more on millennials than all other age categories combined.

Coughlin's message to companies overlooking older adults is: Do so at your own peril.

The Future of Dementia

The Future of Dementia

"My son, be steadfast in honoring your father; do not grieve him as long as he lives. Even if his mind fails, be considerate of him; do not revile him because you are in your prime." (Sirach 12-13).

Dementia stands out as a signature affliction of old age throughout human history. Defined as symptoms linked to loss of memory and thinking skills, dementia takes several forms, with 60-80% caused by Alzheimer's disease. Yet, it is not considered to be a part of normal aging.

Some moderate cognition changes are expected with age, but these do not lead to loss of independence. However, more serious cognitive decline can produce symptoms like rapid forgetting, navigation impairment, inability to solve everyday problems, or difficulty holding ordinary conversations.

Nevertheless, age is strongly correlated with dementia. One estimate shows only a 1.7% prevalence of dementia among those 65-69 years old. But with a doubling of new cases every five years, dementia incidence grows to over 50% by age 90.

10 Tips to Take Care of Your Eyesight in the Digital Age

10 Tips to Take Care of Your Eyesight in the Digital Age

While the digital age has many advantages, it also has many downfalls, especially for older adults. The continuous exposure to screens can cause significant harm to our eyes and vision. In this post, we'll review several tips to help take care of your eyes. These simple tips will enhance and preserve your vision if you spend time in front of the screen.

First, let's look at major eye problems associated with aging:

6 Reasons to Laugh More as We Age

6 Reasons to Laugh More as We Age

Do you know of a medicine that is available at zero cost and attainable almost all the time? You heard us right; it is called laughter!

Laughter contributes to a sense of well-being and encourages you to have an optimistic outlook in life. It leads to a more relaxed state of mind and helps you focus on the positive outcomes of a situation. Laughter allows you to connect to your loved ones and bring an excellent mood to yourself and the people around you. It is true when people say that your attitude affects your body, mind, and soul.

Laughing with your friends, or even on your own, not only has mental but many physical advantages as well. Doctors across the world have suggested that the best, and often, the easiest way of dealing with an issue is to crack a joke and laugh. There is much more depth to this claim, and we will learn more about it as we go on!