Cantissimo Senior Living Blog

Cantissimo Senior Living blog - an educational resource for older adults in lifestyle, wellness, and more.

Posts about Health News (2):

5 Benefits of a Full Night's Sleep for Older Adults

5 Benefits of a Full Night's Sleep for Older Adults

Sleep is essential for health, especially as we age. Many things can interfere with the sleep patterns of an adult. According to Sleephealth.org, "It is estimated that sleep-related problems affect 50 to 70 million Americans of all ages and socioeconomic classes." Sleeping is the time to rest and rejuvenate as the mind and body recover from a long hectic day. Studies have shown that older adults need to sleep for eight hours as sufficient sleep contributes to many facets of health and wellness.

Our bodies undergo several changes as we age, such as producing lower levels of hormones. As a result, we experience a reduction in slow-wave or deep sleep. When the body experiences this, it will produce melatonin, which means continuously experiencing difficulty sleeping, and waking up often during the night. Therefore, it is increasingly important as we age to ensure we get sufficient sleep.

10 Signs Your Loved One is Ready for Assisted Living

10 Signs Your Loved One is Ready for Assisted Living

Gathered around the patio table on a beautiful early autumn evening, talk with friends turned to caring for aging parents. Jan, whose mother lives independently several states away, related an all too familiar story.

"In our daily phone call, I asked Mom how she was doing. She told me she'd fallen the night before. She wasn't hurt but spent the entire night on the living room floor because she could not get up by herself. It wasn't until her friend came by for the usual morning coffee visit that she was able to get up."

"Thank goodness she wasn't hurt," I said. "But I thought she had a medical alert bracelet." Jan gave me an exasperated look. "She does! But she forgets she has it even though we talk about using it in that exact type of situation. When I reminded her that she should have used it, she said that she probably wouldn't have used it even if she had remembered. I asked her why, and she said then the EMTs would have to come, and that would be too much fuss."

Countless other adult children have had similar calls about issues with elderly parents. Excepting a catastrophic event, it's tempting to avoid the question of whether an older loved one should still be living on their own. Many older adults resist losing their independence, so their children are reluctant to suggest an assisted living option to avoid conflict or feelings of guilt.

7 Reasons to Read More in Retirement

7 Reasons to Read More in Retirement

Reading is a wonderful hobby that keeps the mind healthy. Reading at any age has many benefits that include reducing stress, enhancing sleep, improving memory, sharpening decision-making skills, and delaying the development of diseases like dementia and Alzheimer's.

As we age, everyone has many different aspects of life and health to take care of. To live a long and independent life, it is necessary to preserve mental fitness. While this can be a challenge, there are lots of relatively easy and small things you can do daily to help accomplish this. Reading books of interest to you can help a lot in safeguarding your skills and abilities. Learn more about the rest of the benefits of reading in retirement below:

Does Your Workout Routine Create Pain in Your Body?

Does Your Workout Routine Create Pain in Your Body?

All movement should make you feel great during, after, and days later. You might feel that you have worked hard, but you really should not be in pain. Keeping your muscles strong is essential. Muscles are meant to be able to contract and release well to do their jobs effectively and efficiently. Does your workout routine create pain in your body?

New Innovations in Pain Resolution

New Innovations in Pain Resolution

Should we accept pain as a normal part of aging?

Chronic tension/pain has become an epidemic across North America and the industrialized world. The US Department of Health and Human Services estimates that pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease, and cancer combined. The question is, why?

Persistent or recurring pain is defined as pain lasting more than six months after the original tissue damage has healed. The research on chronic (persistent/recurring) pain is compelling. The annual cost to industrialized countries in health care resources and lost productivity is increasing every year. In 2017, the University of Michigan Health reported that the annual cost of treatment and lost productivity due to chronic pain in the USA was $635 billion.

Stress Imprints in Your Body and Causes Pain - How to Reduce Stress

Stress Imprints in Your Body and Causes Pain - How to Reduce Stress

Stress is a fact of life. We have all experienced it at some point in our lives. Stress can be a great motivator when you have a big project to deliver, and when your stress response is well-managed, stress ebbs and flows naturally with life circumstances. When sustained over an extended period, stress becomes dangerous and can lead to illness and disease. According to the Mayo Clinic, prolonged stress can lead to pain and tension, anxiety, poor sleep, fatigue, anger, depression, chest pain, and headaches.

What Does Normal After COVID-19 Look Like for Older Adults?

What Does Normal After COVID-19 Look Like for Older Adults?

COVID-19 has turned the entire world upside-down, and no group has been more affected than those over 55. With the higher risk of complications and death, older adults have a greater stake in this crisis than nearly all other groups. Many seniors have been forced to take stringent quarantine measures and other protective actions to avoid getting sick.

These efforts to avoid disease have created their own problems like feelings of anxiety, boredom, and possibly even depression. As a result, many want to know; how long will the current crisis last? What will the vaccine adoption look like? 

Whenever this storm passes, we'll get back to normal. Or will we? Opinions vary about what "normal" will look like after the pandemic. Some are predicting a "new normal." What might that look like for older adults?

Senior Citizens and COVID-19 – What's Ahead?

Senior Citizens and COVID-19 – What's Ahead?

Even as COVID-19 forces the over 55 generation to take rigorous health precautions, many wonder what the post-pandemic world will look like. As a vulnerable population, seniors, especially those with underlying health conditions, have been given vaccine priority. The general consensus holds that effective vaccine distribution and adoption will allow life to return to normal. What will this "normal" look like?

Q: What will happen to senior housing?

A: During the pandemic, occupancy levels decreased in all in senior living settings: independent living, assisted living, memory care, and skilled nursing. The reasons were fear of contracting the virus and increased costs resulting from containment efforts.

Debunking Senior Living Myths: Part 1 – Senior Living Dangers in the Age of COVID-19

Debunking Senior Living Myths: Part 1 – Senior Living Dangers in the Age of COVID-19

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., significant attention has been given to the impact on senior living facilities. In Minnesota, as of June 1, there were 1,050 deaths related to COVID-19. Of these, 608 (58%) were among skilled nursing facility patients, and 259 (25%) were residents of assisted living facilities. Across the country, reports of severe outbreaks of the infection in senior facilities are regular news.

How is this playing out on the front lines? According to Jennifer Thorson, Executive Director at The Harbors Senior Living Community in Fridley, Minnesota, the pandemic pushed her facility to the limit when it first hit. “We had absolutely no choice but to get on top of this to make sure that we had all the proper procedures in place and be in constant contact with the MN Department of Health for their guidance. Being in a smaller facility such as the Harbors, only having apartments, we were able to control it into one wing of the building and assign a single care provider to take care of those residents who tested positive, limiting the spread even more.”